Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo

Whoa! From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo is a grammatically valid sentence used as an example of how homophones can be used to create complicated constructs […] The sentence uses three possible readings of the word “buffalo”:

1. The plural form of “buffalo”, that is, an American Bison, white buffalo, or African buffalo. The use of the plural enables the omission of articles.
2. Buffalo, New York, the second-largest city in the state of New York
3. A verb meaning to confuse, deceive, or intimidate

Marking each “buffalo” with its use as numbered above gives:

Buffalo(2) buffalo(1) Buffalo(2) buffalo(1) buffalo(3) buffalo(3) Buffalo(2) buffalo(1).

Thus, the sentence turns into a description of the pecking order in the social hierarchy of buffalo from the Buffalo zoo:

[Some] buffalo [from] Buffalo, [who are intimidated by other buffalo from Buffalo], [also themselves] intimidate [other different] buffalo from Buffalo.

Or, changing the grammatical structure slightly for easier understanding:

Some buffalo from Buffalo, who are intimidated by other buffalo from Buffalo, also intimidate other, different, buffalo from Buffalo.

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